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Monday, June 30, 2014

No. 000041 Never do anything inconsistent with your theory of the Case

Do you go on Twitter and charge another department of state government with being incompetent or with running experiments if your theory of the case is the Liberal case that State Government can be entrusted with the health care of Missouri's citizens?

Or, are your actions speaking louder than your words? 

Are you doing something inconsistent with your theory of the case which is something you cannot do?

This fundamental of persuasion is right out of McElhaney's classic text.

A long essay could be written explaining why doing something inconsistent with your theory of the case works against your Ethos (credibility). 

Is such needed?

Wouldn't it be wiser to comment upon the courage of those who are attempting to do what no one has accomplished for children before, in the face of GOP hostility and desire that Public Education be eliminated?

My friends, it is about blocking and tackling.

Stop unforced errors if you have any desire to achieve any Progressive or Liberal goal in Missouri.

Now my theory of  the case is that our problems stem from the failure of us, as Democrats, to have an effective political party.  A feature of that is that we have too many Democratic politicians in Jefferson City who think their thoughts or ideas matter or have weight.

At present, the sole Democrat in Jefferson City that matters is the Governor. Go wait in his waiting room until he will see you and then enter his office on your knees.

Therefore, I have and will continue to urge that no one in the party take action on transfers until we agree upon a Democratic Party Platform on transfers, a platform on which our candidates can campaign this fall.

To that end, my comments have been on and will continue to be on Economics for Democrats from which a number of principles flow.

First, because SB493 fundamentally threatened public education it had to be vetoed.

Support the veto. That is the sole present transfer issue that matters.

Second, the problems in Normandy and North County, and the City of St. Louis, have nothing to do with our schools. Our schools would do a fine job if we tended to the economic issue: the lack of good paying jobs, with benefits, for all.